Moving Stories

Lesley Farlow

Photo Credit: Nick Lacy

Mental Health Connecticut (MHC), in partnership with the award-winning Judy Dworin Performance Project (JDPP), presents Moving Stories, an artistic workshop designed to improve the mental health and wellness of individuals who have experienced trauma and/or a mental health condition.

Moving Stories will be a 10-week workshop open to up to 15 young adults (aged 18-29) per workshop who have experienced trauma or who live with a mental health condition, and/or substance use issue. Through evidence-based approaches that uses a combination of physical and spatial expression, visual arts, words, individual and group activities, and positive problem solving, Moving Stories will help individuals develop an improved sense of wellbeing, connection to others, and a more grounded stance to face everyday life. Moving Stories promises to open up new avenues of healing that will free up energy for constructive expression, interaction, and relaxation in the moment. The workshop will culminate in an informal, interactive, and playful sharing with invited guests, allowing for a safe space for their “moving stories” to be heard and honored.

“She writes things with her movements that I for the life of me could never write with a pen.” ― Christopher Poindexter

upcoming classes
Thanks to the generosity of the Connecticut Community Foundation, we are proud to offer our first Moving Stories workshop available to residents of Greater Waterbury (including Beacon Falls, Bethlehem, Bridgewater, Cheshire, Goshen, Litchfield, Middlebury, Morris, Naugatuck, New Milford, Oxford, Prospect, Roxbury, Southbury, Thomaston, Warren, Washington, Waterbury, Watertown, Wolcott, and Woodbury). There is no cost to participate in this workshop.

This workshop is 100% virtual through Zoom and will take place Wednesday evenings (6:30 – 8:30 p.m.) starting January 6 and ending March 10, 2021. Applications are open through December 16, 2020. No formal movement training is required.

If you are not a resident of one of the above listed towns, but interested in applying for a future Moving Stories workshop, please join our mailing list for updates on upcoming classes.

supporting Moving Stories
The winter 2021 workshop is presented in collaboration with Mental Health Connecticut and the Judy Dworin Performance Project and is in part made possible thanks to the generosity of the Connecticut Community Foundation.

If you are interested in supporting Moving Stories please contact info@mhconn.org for more information.

about the instructors
Lesley Farlow, Certified Movement Analyst and an Associate Professor of Theater and Dance at Trinity College, will be the Lead Teaching Artist. Following twenty years as a performer, teacher, and writer in New York where she performed on Off and Off Off Broadway as well as throughout the U.S. and Europe, Lesley began a long-term connection with Hartford at Trinity College. She worked with Judy Dworin throughout most of her career there as a colleague in the Department of Theater and Dance and performed with the JDPP Ensemble. She also teamed up with JDPP on some of its earliest performance residencies at York Correctional Institution. What drives Lesley is a passion for the performing arts and the transformational possibilities of creativity and live performance. Her work with JDPP exemplifies her belief that creating and performing can significantly contribute to both personal and social transformation.

Judy Dworin, Executive & Artistic Director of Judy Dworin Performance Project (JDPP), will be the Project Supervisor of Moving Stories, bringing years of experience to the workshop. Judy has received numerous awards and most recently received a Lifetime Achievement Award in the Arts from the State of CT Office of the Arts (April 2018). She is a Professor Emerita at Trinity College, where she established the Dance Program and chaired the Theater and Dance Department for many years. Judy’s performance residency work with women at York Correctional Institution over the past 14 years has been the generative seed for the development of a comprehensive residency outreach to populations affected by incarceration, providing arts engagements to children and youth with parents in prison.